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32 Best Online Jobs for Teens

This page may include affiliate links. Please see the disclosure page for more information. Flipping burgers and operating a cash register are not the only ways to make money as a teenager. Working online can offer a more flexible schedule than local jobs for teens. Online jobs can also have higher income potential and utilize different skills. …

The post 32 Best Online Jobs for Teens appeared first on Debt Discipline.


32 Best Online Jobs for Teens was first posted on November 12, 2020 at 11:37 am.
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Why It’s the Year of the Side Hustle

Side hustles have always been a good way to earn more money and better your finances. With so many people in debt while wages have fallen flat, they’ve become especially popular over the past decade. Now, with the coronavirus pandemic, we’ve seen them shoot ahead in popularity even further. 

According to a recent survey by credit-building platform, Self, just over half of Americans plan to start a side hustle as a direct result of the pandemic. The numbers get really interesting when you break them down by age, too. The majority of Millennials (around 70%) plan to start a side hustle, while only a few — around 20% — of Boomers have the same idea. 

Coronavirus and Unemployment: Changing How People Earn Money

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, chances are you already know the heavy toll the pandemic has taken on the economy. Still, it’s worth taking a second look at the numbers. By May 2020, after everything shut down, the number of unemployed people in the U.S. shot up even higher than figures during the Great Depression. It ranged higher than 14 million unemployed people, compared to the Great Depression’s peak of 8.8 million unemployed. The unemployment rate at its peak in 2020 was 16%. 

Today the economy is reopening and the unemployment rate has gone back down, but still stands twice as high as normal — 8% — as of August 2020. Even if you are lucky enough to be back at work today, chances are good that you’re still not earning as much as you were before. Your hours might’ve been reduced, you might’ve missed out on pay raises, or you might’ve suffered a pay cut. 

If you’re still unemployed, the picture isn’t any better. The extra $600 weekly unemployment assistance dropped off at the end of July, leaving many people with normal piddly paycheck amounts. 

Finally, even if you’re one of the lucky ones who’s been totally unaffected by all of this, at least you’ve seen the devastation that can happen and maybe you’re spurred on to make sure that doesn’t happen to you. No matter which segment you fall into, everyone’s seeing how important diversifying your income with a side hustle is right now. 

12 Most Popular Side Gigs of the Year

Whether you call them “side hustles” or not, people have been finding creative ways to earn a little extra on the side ever since economies have existed. But today, with COVID, some side hustles are more popular than others. Here are some of the most popular side gig options this year:

1. Deliver Groceries and Food

With so many people trying to keep their distance, one hot job that’s been booming is food delivery workers — specifically, through apps like DoorDash, GrubHub, UberEats, Instacart, Shipt, and more. All you need is a car and a smartphone. And while your chances of being exposed to COVID are greater than if you’d found an online gig (please, avoid this one if you’re high-risk!), contact-free delivery options are making it a bit safer. 

2. Transcribe Audio Files

If you’re looking for a good way to boost your typing speed and listen to (potentially) interesting conversations, give transcription a try. You can find partner websites that’ll send you audio files or advertise your services in writer’s groups. All you have to do is type out the audio accurately and send your transcription back to the partner. 

The startup cost on this side gig is low — all you need is a computer and internet, which you might already have if you’re reading this. Beyond that, a small investment in a foot pedal — a hands-free way to start and stop audio — keeps your hands on the keyboard so that you type faster and earn more money in the process. 

3. Tutor a Student

The education system is a mess right now. Many kids are stuck at home and are falling behind in their studies. Parents are at their wit’s end, and looking for ways to help their children grow and stay entertained. That’s where you come in. There are many opportunities to tutor students online, and if you and the other party is comfortable, you can even meet up in person for socially-distanced learning.

4. Pet-Sitting and Dog-Walking

Even though normal travel isn’t really a thing right now, there still are more people than ever travelling locally. Many people can only stay in their home so long without going stir-crazy, after all. A lot of pet sitters are finding that business is booming right now, and you can get in on the action, too. 

Apps like Rover and Wag! make it easy to get started. Even if you can’t watch someone’s pup for them, you can still offer your services as a dog walker and get out of the house while still distancing yourself from other people. 

5. Freelance Writing or Starting a Blog

Do you have an interesting story? Would you like to write about other people who do? If so, now’s a great time to start your own blog or freelance writing side hustle. Blogging takes a lot of work and time before it really pays off, although if it does, you can earn a lot of money. Freelance writing might be more lucrative right off the bat, and you can even leverage your new blog as a way to showcase your writing to earn work with paid clients. 

6. Become a Virtual Assistant

With so many people working entirely online these days, an entire new industry of workers have cropped up: virtual assistants. As a virtual assistant, your job may be as varied as the people who hire you. You might find sources for interviews, keep track of tasks in a database, answer reader emails, make graphics, write blog posts, and more. And since it’s entirely virtual, your potential client list is global. 

7. Take Surveys

This side hustle might not replace your day job, but if you have a few extra minutes while you’re watching TV, baking, or spending endless hours listening in on Zoom meetings, you can earn a bit more cash. There are a lot of places to earn money with surveys, so be sure to try your hand at more than one. 

8. Web and App Development

Techy skills are in demand right now, especially with so many people working online. If you know a bit of code — or want to learn — now’s a great time to get started with this side hustle. You can find work through Fiverr and Upwork, or advertise independently elsewhere. If you know how to develop apps, see if you can come up with any ideas to make quarantine life easier for everyone — that would be a hit for sure. 

9. SEO Developer

The only option most local businesses have to reach potential customers these days is online. But the mom-and-pop pizza shop down the road probably isn’t up to snuff when it comes to advertising on Google and social media. These skills are especially in demand right now, and there are many courses you can take to learn more and start this side hustle immediately. 

10. Write eBooks

Are you good at coming up with stories? If you’ve got some time on your hands and you don’t have any pressing money concerns, writing ebooks can be a great way to set up a passive income strategy that’ll keep paying you throughout the future. Just like with blogging, it can be a risky strategy since it may not pay off immediately. But if you have a passion for words, a creative imagination, and an entrepreneurial spirit, this could be a great side hustle for you.

11. Social Media Strategist

Companies often aren’t SEO experts, and they aren’t social media experts either. But if you were raised alongside Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, and love mastering the newest social media channels, this could be a great side hustle for you. You’ll need to learn how to work with brands and companies to represent them online so that they sell more products — and in turn, can pay you the big bucks. 

12. Do Odd Jobs

We’ve covered some of the websites you can use to earn money during the pandemic right now, but it bears repeating here. Websites like TaskRabbit, Fiverr, and Upwork have many more opportunities than what we’ve listed here. 

For example, you could help with mowing lawns, helping someone move to a new house, delivering things from stores, designing printable PDFs, teaching someone how to play guitar, and more. The opportunities are endless, and it’s free to browse and see what small odd jobs are available in your area. 

The Bottom Line

The year 2020 will probably go down in most people’s books as one of the worst on record. It’s important to acknowledge the bad that’s happening, but it’s also important to look forward, too. Even in the midst of all of this craziness, there is an opportunity for growth and a way to better your finances. No one can pinpoint when a pandemic will happen, but you can plan your financial response to big events like this. 

The post Why It’s the Year of the Side Hustle appeared first on Good Financial Cents®.

Source: goodfinancialcents.com

13 Ways to Make Money Delivering Food, Packages and More

This story originally appeared on DollarSprout. Convenience has become increasingly important to people these days. Given how busy our schedules are, it’s easier to have packages, groceries, restaurant meals and prescriptions delivered instead of using our limited free time to run errands. If you’re looking for a way to make some extra cash, and you’re familiar with your local area or spend a lot…

Source: moneytalksnews.com

How to Save for Retirement in Your 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s

You probably don’t need us to tell you that the earlier you start saving for retirement, the better. But let’s face it: For a lot of people, the problem isn’t that they don’t understand how compounding works. They start saving late because their paychecks will only stretch so far.

Whether you’re in your 20s or your golden years are fast-approaching, saving and investing whatever you can will help make your retirement more comfortable. We’ll discuss how to save for retirement during each decade, along with the hurdles you may face at different stages of life.

How Much Should You Save for Retirement?

A good rule of thumb is to save between 10% and 20% of pre-tax income for retirement. But the truth is, the actual amount you need to save for retirement depends on a lot of factors, including:

  • Your age. If you get a late start, you’ll need to save more.
  • Whether your employer matches contributions. The 10% to 20% guideline includes your employer’s match. So if your employer matches your contributions dollar-for-dollar, you may be able to get away with less.
  • How aggressively you invest. Taking more risk usually leads to larger returns, but your losses will be steeper if the stock market tanks.
  • How long you plan to spend in retirement. It’s impossible to predict how long you’ll be able to work or how long you’ll live. But if you plan to retire early or people in your family often live into their mid-90s, you’ll want to save more.

How to Save for Retirement at Every Age

Now that you’re ready to start saving, here’s a decade-by-decade breakdown of savings strategies and how to make your retirement a priority.

Saving for Retirement in Your 20s

A dollar invested in your 20s is worth more than a dollar invested in your 30s or 40s. The problem: When you’re living on an entry-level salary, you just don’t have that many dollars to invest, particularly if you have student loan debt.

Prioritize Your 401(k) Match

If your company offers a 401(k) plan, a 403(b) plan or any retirement account with matching contributions, contribute enough to get the full match — unless of course you wouldn’t be able to pay bills as a result. The stock market delivers annual returns of about 8% on average. But if your employer gives you a 50% match, you’re getting a 50% return on your contribution before your money is even invested. That’s free money no investor would ever pass up.

Pay off High-Interest Debt

After getting that employer match, focus on tackling any high-interest debt. Those 8% average annual stock market returns pale in comparison to the average 16% interest rate for people who have credit card debt. In a typical year, you’d expect a  $100 investment could earn you $8. Put that $100 toward your balance? You’re guaranteed to save $16.

Take More Risks

Look, we’re not telling you to throw your money into risky investments like bitcoin or the penny stock your cousin won’t shut up about. But when you start investing, you’ll probably answer some questions to assess your risk tolerance. Take on as much risk as you can mentally handle, which means you’ll invest mostly in stocks with a small percentage in bonds. Don’t worry too much about a stock market crash. Missing out on growth is a bigger concern right now.

Build Your Emergency Fund

Building an emergency fund that could cover your expenses for three to six months is a great way to safeguard your retirement savings. That way you won’t need to tap your growing nest egg in a cash crunch. This isn’t money you should have invested, though. Keep it in a high-yield savings account, a money market account or a certificate of deposit (CD).

Tame Lifestyle Inflation

We want you to enjoy those much-deserved raises ahead of you — but keep lifestyle inflation in check. Don’t spend every dollar each time your paycheck gets higher. Commit to investing a certain percentage of each raise and then use the rest as you please.

Saving for Retirement in Your 30s

If you’re just starting to save in your 30s, the picture isn’t too dire. You still have about three decades left until retirement, but it’s essential not to delay any further. Saving may be a challenge now, though, if you’ve added kids and homeownership to the mix.

Invest in an IRA

Opening a Roth IRA is a great way to supplement your savings if you’ve only been investing in your 401(k) thus far. A Roth IRA is a solid bet because you’ll get tax-free money in retirement.

In both 2020 and 2021, you can contribute up to $6,000, or $7,000 if you’re over 50. The deadline to contribute isn’t until tax day for any given year, so you can still make 2020 contributions until April 15, 2021. If you earn too much to fund a Roth IRA, or you want the tax break now (even though it means paying taxes in retirement), you can contribute to a traditional IRA.

Your investment options with a 401(k) are limited. But with an IRA, you can invest in whatever stocks, bonds, mutual funds or exchange-traded funds (ETFs) you choose.

Pro Tip

If you or your spouse isn’t working but you can afford to save for retirement, consider a spousal IRA. It’s a regular IRA, but the working spouse funds it for the non-earning spouse. 

Avoid Mixing Retirement Money With Other Savings

You’re allowed to take a 401(k) loan for a home purchase. The Roth IRA rules give you the flexibility to use your investment money for a first-time home purchase or college tuition. You’re also allowed to withdraw your contributions whenever you want. Wait, though. That doesn’t mean you should.

The obvious drawback is that you’re taking money out of the market before it’s had time to compound. But there’s another downside. It’s hard to figure out if you’re on track for your retirement goals when your Roth IRA is doing double duty as a college savings account or down payment fund.

Start a 529 Plan While Your Kids Are Young

Saving for your own future takes higher priority than saving for your kids’ college. But if your retirement funds are in shipshape, opening a 529 plan to save for your children’s education is a smart move. Not only will you keep the money separate from your nest egg, but by planning for their education early, you’ll avoid having to tap your savings for their needs later on.

Keep Investing When the Stock Market Crashes

The stock market has a major meltdown like the March 2020 COVID-19 crash about once a decade. But when a crash happens in your 30s, it’s often the first time you have enough invested to see your net worth take a hit. Don’t let panic take over. No cashing out. Commit to dollar-cost averaging and keep investing as usual, even when you’re terrified.

Saving for Retirement in Your 40s

If you’re in your 40s and started saving early, you may have a healthy nest egg by now. But if you’re behind on your retirement goals, now is the time to ramp things up. You still have plenty of time to save, but you’ve missed out on those early years of compounding.

Continue Taking Enough Risk

You may feel like you can afford less investment risk in your 40s, but you still realistically have another two decades left until retirement. Your money still has — and needs — plenty of time to grow. Stay invested mostly in stocks, even if it’s more unnerving than ever when you see the stock market tank.

Put Your Retirement Above Your Kids’ College Fund

You can only afford to pay for your kids’ college if you’re on track for retirement. Talk to your kids early on about what you can afford, as well their options for avoiding massive student loan debt, including attending a cheaper school, getting financial aid, and working while going to school. Your options for funding your retirement are much more limited.

Keep Your Mortgage

Mortgage rates are historically low — well below 3% as of December 2020. Your potential returns are much higher for investing, so you’re better off putting extra money into your retirement accounts. If you haven’t already done so, consider refinancing your mortgage to get the lowest rate.

Invest Even More

Now is the time to invest even more if you can afford to. Keep getting that full employer 401(k) match. Beyond that, try to max out your IRA contributions. If you have extra money to invest on top of that, consider allocating more to your 401(k). Or you could invest in a taxable brokerage account if you want more flexibility on how to invest.

Meet With a Financial Adviser

You’re about halfway through your working years when you’re in your 40s. Now is a good time to meet with a financial adviser. If you can’t afford one, a financial counselor is typically less expensive. They’ll focus on fundamentals like budgeting and paying off debt, rather than giving investment advice.

A woman waves her hands in the air as she overlooks a mountainous view in Alaska.

Saving for Retirement in Your 50s

By your 50s, those retirement years that once seemed like they were an eternity away are getting closer. Maybe that’s an exciting prospect — or perhaps it fills you with dread. Whether you want to keep working forever or retirement can’t come soon enough, now is the perfect time to start setting goals for when you want to retire and what you want your retirement to look like.

Review Your Asset Allocation

In your 50s, you may want to start shifting more into safe assets, like bonds or CDs. Your money has less time to recover from a stock market crash. Be careful, though. You still want to be invested in stocks so you can earn returns that will keep your money growing. With interest rates likely to stay low through 2023, bonds and CDs probably won’t earn enough to keep pace with inflation.

Take Advantage of Catch-up Contributions

If you’re behind on retirement savings, give your funds a boost using catch-up contributions. In 2020 and 2021, you can contribute:

  • $1,000 extra to a Roth or traditional IRA (or split the money between the two) once you’re 50
  • $6,500 extra to your 401(k) once you’re 50
  • $1,000 extra to a health savings account (HSA) once you’re 55.

Work More if You’re Behind

Your window for catching up on retirement savings is getting smaller now. So if you’re behind, consider your options for earning extra money to put into your nest egg. You could take on a side hustle, take on freelance work or work overtime if that’s a possibility to bring in extra cash. Even if you intend to work for another decade or two, many people are forced to retire earlier than they planned. It’s essential that you earn as much as possible while you can.

Pay off Your Remaining Debt

Since your 50s is often when you start shifting away from high-growth mode and into safer investments, now is a good time to use extra money to pay off lower-interest debt, including your mortgage. Retirement will be much more relaxing if you can enjoy it debt-free.

FROM THE RETIREMENT FORUM
Re-locating
Trish Young
Military pension & SS
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TSP and mortgage
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See more in Retirement or ask a money question

Saving for Retirement in Your 60s

Hooray, you’ve made it! Hopefully your retirement goals are looking attainable by now after working for decades to get here. But you still have some big decisions to make. Someone in their 60s in 2021 could easily spend another two to three decades in retirement. Your challenge now is to make that hard-earned money last as long as possible.

Make a Retirement Budget

Start planning your retirement budget at least a couple years before you actually retire. Financial planners generally recommend replacing about 70% to 80% of your pre-retirement income. Common income sources for seniors include:

  • Social Security benefits. Monthly benefits replace about 40% of pre-retirement income for the average senior.
  • Retirement account withdrawals. Money you take out from your retirement accounts, like your 401(k) and IRA.
  • Defined-benefit pensions. These are increasingly rare in the private sector, but still somewhat common for those retiring from a career in public service.
  • Annuities. Though controversial in the personal finance world, an annuity could make sense if you’re worried about outliving your savings.
  • Other investment income. Some seniors supplement their retirement and Social Security income with earnings from real estate investments or dividend stocks, for example.
  • Part-time work. A part-time job can help you delay dipping into your retirement savings account, giving your money more time to grow.

You can plan on some expenses going away. You won’t be paying payroll taxes or making retirement contributions, for example, and maybe your mortgage will be paid off. But you generally don’t want to plan for any budget cuts that are too drastic.

Even though some of your expenses will decrease, health care costs eat up a large chunk of senior income, even once you’re eligible for Medicare coverage — and they usually increase much faster than inflation.

Develop Your Social Security Strategy

You can take your Social Security benefits as early as 62 or as late as age 70. But the earlier you take benefits, the lower your monthly benefits will be. If your retirement funds are lacking, delaying as long as you can is usually the best solution. Taking your benefit at 70 vs. 62 will result in monthly checks that are about 76% higher. However, if you have significant health problems, taking benefits earlier may pay off.

Pro Tip

Use Social Security’s Retirement Estimator to estimate what your monthly benefit will be.

Figure Out How Much You Can Afford to Withdraw

Once you’ve made your retirement budget and estimated how much Social Security you’ll receive, you can estimate how much you’ll be able to safely withdraw from your retirement accounts. A common retirement planning guideline is the 4% rule: You withdraw no more than 4% of your retirement savings in the first year, then adjust the amount for inflation.

If you have a Roth IRA, you can let that money grow as long as you want and then enjoy it tax-free. But you’ll have to take required minimum distributions, or RMDs, beginning at age 72 if you have a 401(k) or a traditional IRA. These are mandatory distributions based on your life expectancy. The penalties for not taking them are stiff: You’ll owe the IRS 50% of the amount you were supposed to withdraw.

Keep Investing While You’re Working

Avoid taking money out of your retirement accounts while you’re still working. Once you’re over age 59 ½, you won’t pay an early withdrawal penalty, but you want to avoid touching your retirement funds for as long as possible.

Instead, continue to invest in your retirement plans as long as you’re still earning money. But do so cautiously. Keep money out of the stock market if you’ll need it in the next five years or so, since your money doesn’t have much time to recover from a stock market crash in your 60s.

A Final Thought: Make Your Retirement About You

Whether you’re still working or you’re already enjoying your golden years, this part is essential: You need to prioritize you. That means your retirement savings goals need to come before bailing out family members, or paying for college for your children and grandchildren. After all, no one else is going to come to the rescue if you get to retirement with no savings.

If you’re like most people, you’ll work for decades to get to retirement. The earlier you start planning for it, the more stress-free it will be.

Robin Hartill is a certified financial planner and a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder. She writes the Dear Penny personal finance advice column. Send your tricky money questions to DearPenny@thepennyhoarder.com.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Source: thepennyhoarder.com

The biggest truth in personal finance

The biggest lie in personal finance? You can be rich if you just cut spending. The biggest truth is you can’t frugalize income you don’t earn.

Source: getrichslowly.org

15 best paid survey sites in 2020

If you have some spare time and are looking for ways to make a little extra money, you could try filling out surveys for money. With survey companies paying out millions of dollars to users each year, it’s a legitimate way to earn an income online.

Or is it? There’s a natural skepticism whenever this topic is brought up in personal finance circles, and for good reason. For starters, far too many people have been burned by the claims of ‘scammy’ survey sites in the past, walking away with nothing more than a whole lot of wasted time. And, let’s face it, you’re never going to get rich filling out online surveys. Forget rich, you’re going to struggle just to get to minimum wage.

So why even bother? Survey sites are definitely not for everyone, yet they remain very popular. If you stick to the most reputable ones, there is money to be made. We’re not talking rent-erasing money, but it might cover the cost of your monthly Netflix subscription, or subsidize your coffee habit, which for some people is worth the effort.

In this article, I’ve selected what I think are the best online survey companies out there today. Most have been around for several years and have established a fairly solid reputation. Some are better than others, without a doubt. Before we dive in, here are a few tips on ways to maximize your online survey earnings.

How to earn more with online surveys

As I already mentioned, if you’re looking to make money with only one survey site, you’ll likely be disappointed. Most sites pay very little per survey, often less than $1, while the sites that claim to pay more, say $5 per survey, tend to send very few surveys your way. Still, if you’re willing to put in the time, there are things you can do to maximize your earnings.

Sign up on more sites – It only makes sense, but by signing up for more sites, you’ll increase your potential earnings by increasing the number of surveys you qualify for.

Opt for the higher paying activities – In addition to taking surveys, many of these sites will reward you for other activities, such as searching the web, watching videos, or participating in focus groups (rare). Simple tasks pay less than more detailed ones. Pay attention to the higher paying activities, and stick with those.

Register for sweepstakes – Many survey websites provide an option to use your points to register in sweepstakes, where the prizes can be as much as $500, or $1000. While there is no guarantee you will win, consider taking the chance with some of your points, to improve your odds of a better payout.

Survey Junkie

Top Feature: Quick payment via PayPal

Typical Earnings: $1 – $3 per survey

Survey Junkie has been around since 2013 and is one of my favorites. They reward users with points for completing surveys, which are then converted to dollars. Surveys are worth between 50 and 450 points each, with 100 points equalling $1. Earnings can be paid out via PayPal or in the form of e-gift cards. Unlike many companies on this list, Survey Junkie sticks to what they know best, surveys. There are no rewards for shopping online, browsing the internet, or watching videos. You can cash out as soon as your earnings reach $10, which is a nice feature, and payments via PayPal are processed within 24 hours, which is very quick when compared to many of its competitors.

SwagBucks

Top Feature: More options to earn money

Typical Earnings: $1 per survey

Swagbucks is more than just surveys, rewarding users for shopping online, searching the web, playing games, and more. Survey earnings can be very minimal, less than $1 per, but you have no shortage of options to make money. Like Survey Junkie, SwagBucks users are compensated in the form of cash via PayPal, and gift cards. A nice feature is the ability to redeem gift cards for as little as $3, while the minimum PayPal cash payout is $25. To help you get paid sooner, SwagBucks offers a $5 sign up bonus.

Pinecone Research

Top Feature: Offer payment via check

Typical Earnings: minimum $3 per survey

Pinecone Research is another long standing survey company that rewards you with points for completing surveys. They pay well for surveys, at a minimum of $3 each. The catch is that because they are searching for a specific demographic at different times, they operate on an invite only basis so the number of survey opportunities are limited. Still, it’s worth signing up as a way of padding diversifying your survey income. Pinecone is run by Nielsen, the same organization that measures television viewership ratings.

MyPoints

Top Feature: $5 bonus after completing 5 surveys

Typical Earnings: $.30-$.50 per survey

MyPoints is owned by Prodege, the same company that owns SwagBucks. They’re similar in that you can earn points a number of ways, including online shopping, watching videos, and playing games. They offer plenty of survey opportunities, but the earnings per survey tend to be very low. You do get a $5 bonus after completing your first 5 surveys however. Payment options include PayPal cash and gift cards.

Inbox Dollars

Top Feature: $5 sign up bonus

Typical Earnings: $.50 – $5 per survey

Inbox Dollars pays cash for completing a variety of activities online: answering surveys, fulfilling offers, watching videos, playing games etc. While you can earn up to $5 when you complete a survey, the average payout is much lower than that. A positive is that they have a large number of surveys to choose from, so if you have the time, you can increase your earnings that way. Before you complete a survey, or an activity, Inbox Dollars will let you know how much you’ll be paid. That way, you can decide if it’s worth your time. You can receive payment via gift cards, PayPal cash, or a check in the mail. The minimum payout amount is $30.

Opinion Outpost

Top Feature:Convert points to travel credits

Typical Earnings: $.30 – $3 per survey

When you complete surveys with Opinion Outpost, you’ll earn points that can be converted a number of ways. In addition to receiving PayPal cash or gift cards, you can turn your earnings into travel credits, by joining the MileagePlus program. As with most survey companies, you’ll be required to fill out a questionnaire when you register, so that Opinion Outpost can collect your demographic information and make sure you’re legit. According to their website, survey topics are varied, and include anything from electronics and medicine, to sports and politics, even your eating habits.

VIP Voice

Top Feature: Sweepstakes entries

Typical Earnings: No cash payout, sweepstakes entries

VIP Voice works a bit differently than the other survey companies on this list. You earn points for completing surveys, but they can’t be converted into cash or gift cards. Instead, points can be used to enter sweepstakes, or online auctions on sites like Bidland and Sweepland. The problem with this is that there is no guarantee that you’ll be compensated for the time you spend completing surveys. If you don’t mind the idea of taking your chances with sweepstakes, then there are plenty of surveys you can fill out with VIPVoice. Upon signing up, you are entered into their registration sweepstakes, for a chance to win $1000.

LifePoints

Top Feature: 10 LifePoints at sign up

Typical Earnings: $.50 – $1 per survey

With LifePoints, you can convert points for PayPal cash once you reach a minimum $20 payout. The downside is that the amount you earn per survey is fairly low, usually less than $1. They do claim to have paid more than $20 million out to members in the past year alone, however. Survey invites are sent out via email, and the number you receive each month will vary based on the type of data being collected, and your suitability to complete the survey. While LifePoints lacks the optionality of a Survey Junkie or Swagbucks, it works well if you’re looking for a basic survey site.

Vindale Research

Top Feature: $1 sign up bonus

Typical Earnings: $1 – $5 per survey

Vindale Research doesn’t incorporate a point system, meaning that your earnings are expressed as a dollar value only. This way, you always know what you’ve earned, at a glance. Payment is via PayPal, but you will need a minimum of $50 before you can cash out. Of note, Vindale offers other earning opportunities that pay more than surveys. For example, you may be able to write product reviews, which pay as much as $75 each. Of course, these opportunities don’t come along very often.

Prize Rebel

Top Feature: Offers a bonus loyalty program

Typical Earnings: $.40 – $.60 per survey

Prize Rebel has been around for more than 10 years, during which they’ve paid out over $19 million to their members. With Prize Rebel, signing up is easy, as they only require your name and email address to open a free account. They will gather more of your personal demographic information when you complete your first survey, but you’ll earn points for doing so. What makes prize Rebel standout is their loyalty bonus program, which rewards members based on the number of surveys they complete. You can earn a bonus of up to 3% on your earnings, not to mention a 3% discount when you redeem your prize (Diamond level). 500 points equal to $5, and earnings can be redeemed for PayPal cash, gift cards, or Dwolla cash.

Survey Club

Top Feature: Variety of earnings options

Typical Earnings: Up to $5 per survey

With Survey Club, you can earn up to $5 per survey, although the vast majority will be much lower than that. They also give users the opportunity to participate in focus groups, some of which pay handsomely, up to $200 per hour. Survey Club doesn’t actually host surveys, rather they steer towards surveys on other websites. What makes Survey Club standout from their competition is the ways in which you can earn. Not only can you be paid in cash or gift cards, you can also make charitable contributions, receive a prepaid debit card, and enter draws and sweepstakes. The minimum earnings required to cash out is $25.

Harris Poll Online

Top Feature: $10,000 sweepstakes entry with every completed survey

Typical Earnings: $1 per survey

With Harris Poll Online, you earn points for completing surveys, which can be redeemed for purchases at a number of leading websites. Their screening process is quite detailed, as they lead you through a series of demographics questions. To complete surveys, you must login in to the Harris website, surveys aren’t sent via email. At an average of around $1 per survey, the earn rate is modest, but the more you visit their site and take surveys, the more money you’ll make. I do like the fact that they enter you into a draw for a $10,000 sweepstakes every time you complete a survey, and they also allow you to make charitable donations with your earnings.

OneOpinion

Top Feature: Lightning fast sign up process

Typical Earnings: Up to $5 per survey

The sign up process with OneOpinion is very quick, which allows you to start earning without a lot of effort. Their surveys pay as much as $5 each, but typical earnings are lower than that. Users earn points that can be exchanged for gift cards (there is no PayPal option with OneOpinion). You’ll need to accumulate $25 worth of points before you can redeem, and 1,000 points has a value of $1.

Ipsos iSay

Top Feature: Low minimum payout

Typical Earnings: Up to $1 per survey

iSay by Ipsos is similar to most other survey sites in that you earn points that can be converted to PayPal cash or used to redeem gift cards. The payout per survey is very low, but Ipsos does have a unique point multiplier, that rewards users loyalty with bonus points after they reach a certain number of surveys. After completing 5 surveys, for example, you’ll receive 25 bonus points. One thing I like about iSay, is that they have a low minimum payout. You only need 500 points ($5 value) before you can redeem for PayPal cash. With iSay, 100 points has a value of $1.

ProOpinion

Top Feature: Targeted surveys based on area of expertise

Typical Earnings: Not available

The sign up process with ProOpinion is quite detailed. That’s because their mandate is to select surveys that align closely to your individual expertise. When you complete surveys, you earn points that can be redeemed one of 4 ways: PayPal cash, Amazon gift cards, Apple store & iTunes gift cards, and charitable donations via The American Red Cross. Unfortunately, I was unable to find any information on the Pro Opinion website regarding the points you earn, and how much they’re worth. Other sites are more transparent. The data collected is used in articles and other content found on the Pro Opinion website. The information provided is geared towards helping business professionals learn and grow.

The benefits of completing online surveys

There you have it, my list of top paid survey sites for 2020. If you’ve read through these mini-reviews and are interested in getting paid to take surveys, my recommendation would be to start with Survey Junkie and Swagbucks, and go from there. If you need more motivation, there’s another reason filling out online surveys may be beneficial.

On the homepage of the Survey Junkie website, is the caption, “Share your opinion to help brands deliver better products and services”. Personally, I like the idea of having a voice, of being able to influence the direction a company takes with its products and services, even if it’s in a very small way.

Source: getrichslowly.org