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Home Buyer’s Guide: How to Purchase a Property, From Start to Finish [Free Download]

Purchasing a home is both exciting and a major milestone in your life, so you’ll want to be prepared for what to expect to avoid a stressful process. Having an in-depth look at the buyer’s journey can help you make informed and confident decisions.

From finding a real estate agent, negotiating offers to getting your keys on closing day, we’ve outlined all the steps of a home buyer’s journey in our free Buyer’s Guide, which you can download here.

The Buyer’s Guide will cover the buyer’s timeline from meeting an agent to preparing for closing day. We’ve outlined the 8 steps in a home buyer’s journey below.

1. Working With An Agent

Every city is filled with thousands of agents, but not all are equal. We believe it is important to choose an agent that you feel confident with. Before you commit to working with an agent, make sure you have a good understanding of the knowledge and experience they offer. It’s important that you ask your questions before making the decision to work with them.

2. Financing Your Purchase

Before you set a budget and start looking for a home, you’ll have to understand what costs to expect when purchasing a home. Here are some of the major costs involved:

  • Deposits
  • Down payments
  • Mortgage insurance
  • Closing costs

You’ll also want to calculate a rough estimate of the down payment that you will be expected to pay. Depending on the price of your home, your minimum down payment can range from 5% to 20%. If you’re interested in learning more about how to finance your home, you can get our free Financing Your Purchase guide here.

3. Searching For A Home

An important part of searching for a home is understanding how the home will fit with your needs and your lifestyle. You’ll want to consider home ownership as well as different types of properties and features. 

Types of Home Ownership

  • Freehold Ownership
    • You purchase the home and directly own the lot of land it sits on
  • Condominium Ownership
    • For condos, you own specific parts of one building: titled ownership of your unit, along with shared ownership in the condo corporation that owns the common spaces and amenities
  • Co-Op Ownership
    • You own an exact portion of the building as a whole and also have exclusive use of your unit

Types of Properties

  • Detached houses
  • Semi-detached houses
  • Attached houses
  • Condos and apartments
  • Multi-unit

Tip: Depending on your budget and desired location, you may need to be flexible to find a home that meets your needs. By being willing to trade some features for others, you’ll have more options to choose from.

4. Negotiating An Offer

When you are making an offer to purchase a home, the purchase agreement should include the essential components listed below. Your agent can help put together an offer that is compelling, while safeguarding your interests and puts you in a competitive position to secure your new home.

You’ll also have the opportunity to choose the conditions that you’ll want in your offer. Some of these may include a home inspection or a status certificate review.

5. Financial Due Diligence

Whenever you make an offer on a house, you need to provide a deposit to secure the offer. The deposit is in the form of a certified cheque, bank draft, or wire transfer; it’s held in trust by the selling brokerage and is applied towards your down payment if your offer is successful.

There are two types of deposits:

  • Upon acceptance
    • The deposit is provided within 24 hours of the seller choosing your offer
  • Herewith
    • The deposit is provided when the offer is made

6. Property Due Diligence

To firm up a deal or educate yourself more on the state of the property, you’ll likely want to have a home inspection if you’re purchasing a house. If you’re purchasing a condo, then your lawyer will review the building’s status certificate.

Home Inspection

A home inspector will assess elements of the home such as the walls, windows, plumbing, heating and roof to judge the condition of the home. This process is non-invasive and is essential to help provide buyers with a good idea of the home’s current condition and the confidence of putting in an offer. 

Tip: The home inspector will provide a summary of suggested work along with a minimum budget estimate for the repairs needed. 

Status Certificates

If you’re purchasing a condominium, you’ll need to obtain a status certificate from the condo board or management for your lawyer’s review. This document will include valuable information about the condo’s budget, legal issues, reserve fund, maintenance fees and future fees increases – and the lawyer can help identify potential red flags

7. Preparing For Closing

Before the big day, you’ll want to keep a checklist of what to do ahead of time. Some of these include:

  • Review your contract
  • Complete a final walkthrough of the home
  • Purchase home insurance
  • Meet with your lawyer
  • Know how much cash you’ll need
  • Secure cash required for closing

8. Closing Day

Closing Day is when you’ll finally get the keys to your new home! In addition to bringing the cash required for closing, you’ll have to sign a few more documents which will include:

  • Mortgage loan
  • Title transfer
  • Statement of adjustments
  • Tax certificates

For the full details on the home buyer’s journey including examples, advice, pictures and sample calculations, download a copy of our free Buyer’s Guide here.

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A Guide To Everything You Need To Know About Home Ownership Costs [Free Download]

Along with the excitement of purchasing a new home, comes the additional costs that you will be expected to pay as a homeowner. Apart from covering the mortgage of your home, you’ll have additional expenses – such as home insurance – that you will be expected to cover. If you’re looking to budget for a home purchase, it’s important that you consider these costs as they can add up to thousands of dollars each year.

To help you make educated decisions when budgeting, we’ve compiled a list of the major home ownership costs in one free, downloadable guide. Get the Home Ownership Costs to Consider guide here.

Home Insurance

Home insurance policies help protect against serious damage and destruction, like fires, leaks, floods, or break-ins. It also protects a homeowner from personal liability. Some banks may offer home insurance products, although you can typically purchase a home insurance policy through a home insurance agent or broker. 

Tip: You may get better rates if you use a broker or agent. It’s also important to keep in mind that policies typically renew on an annual basis.

Condo Fees

The cost of maintenance fees should be taken into account when you’re buying a condo. This recurring cost is in addition to your mortgage and impacts how much home you can afford. 

Your mandatory monthly fee will vary by your building and square footage. It typically covers:

  • Utilities (such as water and garbage collection)
  • Building insurance
  • Maintenance of common areas (such as the gym, pool, front desk, hallways, landscaping)
  • Building reserve fund (covers emergencies and long-term maintenance projects such as a new roof or elevators repairs)

What Are Status Certificates?

If you’re looking to purchase a condo, you’ll want to look into obtaining a status certificate so that you have as much information about the building and your unit as possible before buying. A status certificate provides valuable information about the condo corporation and its financial

situation. It includes details on the budget, legal issues, the reserve fund, maintenance fees, and any fee increases expected in the future. 

Tip: You’ll want to carefully review your status certificate with your lawyer before making a purchase.

Property Tax

Property taxes are paid annually by homeowners to their municipality. These taxes are ongoing and are separate from your mortgage. Your annual property tax can often be paid in installments.

Tip: It’s important to remember that this cost is not due at closing, but is a recurring cost.

How Are Property Taxes Calculated?

Your property tax rate will vary depending on the value of your property as assessed by your provincial assessment authority. This is then multiplied by a rate that falls between 0.5% to 2.5%.

How Do You Pay Property Taxes?

You can pay your property taxes either through your mortgage provider or directly to your municipality. 

Your Utility Bills

When you purchase a home, you’ll have to set up or transfer your utility bills to your new home. If you live in a condo, these costs may be included in your monthly maintenance fee. Your utility bill will include:

  • Hydro (electricity)
  • Heat
  • Water and Garbage
  • Internet, Phone, Cable

For the full details on the home buyer’s journey including examples, advice, pictures and sample calculations, download a copy of our free Home Ownership Costs to Consider Guide here.

The post A Guide To Everything You Need To Know About Home Ownership Costs [Free Download] appeared first on Zoocasa Blog.

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A Guide to Real Estate Counter Offers

realtor in city condo

Unless you’re fresh out of a Negotiating 101 final and ready to huck your textbook straight into the trash, navigating real estate counter offers might not be at the top of your mind.

That’s OK. For most folks, the wild and sometimes-bumpy ride of buying or selling a house isn’t something they’re necessarily prepared for.

homebuying process, unexpected twists and turns can arise. After sifting through hundreds of listings, attending several showings, and putting an offer in on a dream home (or two, or three), the deal can be far from done.

There are many reasons why it takes time to buy a house, and counter offers can certainly be one of them. A real estate counter offer can come into play in these scenarios:

A Change in Sales Price

One of the most commonly contested items in the closing of a house is the sales price. If buyers come in lower than the asking price with their offer, sellers might counter with the original asking price (if they’re unwilling to negotiate) or somewhere between the asking price and the offer.

Requesting a Later Closing Date

Sometimes sellers simply need more time to vacate the premises. Whether they have unfinished business or unexpected plans, they may present a counter offer that extends the escrow period to allow them more time to move out.

Increasing the Earnest Money Deposit

In some cases, the seller could up the ante by increasing the earnest, or “good faith,” money deposit the buyer submits with the offer. Earnest money deposits are typically between 1% and 3% of the purchase price, but in a hot market, there’s a chance the seller could ask for more to ensure the buyer is serious about purchasing the property.

The Removal of Certain Contingencies

Contingency clauses are actions or conditions that must be met before a real estate contract becomes binding. Common contingencies, which most sellers will see as standard in a real estate offer, are:

•   An appraisal contingency to protect buyers if the property is valued lower than the amount they offer.
•   A financing contingency that allows buyers adequate time to obtain a mortgage or other financing to purchase the property.
•   An inspection contingency that ensures buyers have the right to a thorough inspection of the property within a specified period of time.

Some contingencies, however, are considered less than standard. For example, a home sale contingency grants buyers a set amount of time to sell their existing home so they can finance the new property. Some sellers may find this contingency burdensome, particularly in a hot market, so they could make a counter offer that removes the home sale contingency. They can also counter with a “kick-out clause” that gives a real estate agent the right to keep showing the house while buyers attempt to sell their existing home.

Requesting Repairs

If a home inspection reveals necessary repairs or renovations to the property, the buyer could submit a counter offer to negotiate a lower price or ask the seller to complete the repairs before closing.

Deciding Who Covers Closing Costs

In a buyer’s market, it might be possible to negotiate some or all of the closing costs to be paid by the seller. These costs include appraisal fees, settlement fees, title policies, recording fees, land surveys, and transfer tax. Many home buyers are surprised by how expensive closing costs are, but in particularly hot markets with multiple offers, sellers can counter with a simple “no” to indicate they won’t be covering those costs for the buyer.

What’s the Typical Counter Offer Process?

While real estate counter offers vary depending on the market, the seller’s unique circumstances, and other standalone factors, there are some fairly standard parameters to the counter offer process:

What’s a ‘Normal’ Number of Counter Offers?

There’s no legal limit to the number of counter offers that can occur in a real estate transaction. Initial offers, counter offers, and subsequent counter offers could ping pong back and forth for weeks or more.

Knowing the local real estate market can be key here. In a buyer’s market with plenty of houses for sale, sellers might want to be cautious about submitting an unnecessary number of counter offers.

Similarly, in a seller’s market where inventory is low and buyer competition is high, buyers might want to limit the number of counter offers they push back at the seller.

Can a Seller Make Simultaneous Counter Offers?

Depending on the state where the real estate transaction takes place, a seller may or may not be able to make counter offers to more than one buyer. That said, most real estate agents advise against multiple simultaneous counteroffers, as it could end up in two legally binding contracts for the seller.

How Long Does the Process Take?

Number of counter offers aside, home buyers can expect a closing to take 45 days on average. But how long it takes still varies from buyer to buyer, with factors like whether they’re paying cash, how long it takes them to find an inspector, and if the house appraises at a lower value, affecting the overall timeline.

How to Counter Offer in Real Estate

To some degree there’s such a thing as real estate counter offer etiquette. Here are a few things to consider when engaging in the counter offer process:

Having a Comprehensive Picture of Costs

For buyers, having an accurate handle on what it will cost to buy the house is essential for negotiating counter offers discerningly.

mortgage calculator helps buyers break down the cost of purchasing a home.

Going In With a Strong Offer

A “strong” offer is backed by data that defines what’s happening in the market, and research (with the help of an agent) around what’s considered “fair market value.”

Coming in at 15% or more under the fair market value is generally considered a “lowball” offer and can start buyers off on the wrong foot. In some cases, sellers might skip right over anything that isn’t considered a strong offer.

Knowing What Can Be Negotiated

One of the first steps in making a real estate counter offer is knowing what can be negotiated:

•  Possession date. Giving the sellers more time to move out could mean an exchange for a condition the buyer desires. Buyers hoping to move in sooner might make a counter offer requesting an earlier possession date.
•  Personal property. Some of the seller’s personal property like furniture, window treatments, artwork, or gardening tools could be negotiated into the contract in a counter offer.
•  Home warranty. Older houses can come with their own unique sets of systems and appliances, so buyers might make a counter offer asking the sellers to cover the cost of a one- to two-year home warranty ($350 to $600 annually, on average) if unexpected repairs need to be made after move-in.
•  Earnest money deposit. Whether buyers are trying to reduce their risk of something going wrong during closing or strengthen their offer, they can negotiate a lower or higher earnest money deposit with a counter offer.

Being Timely and Responsive

Real estate offers and counter offers often come with a set expiration date, so time is usually of the essence. Forty-eight hours is a standard acceptance window in many real estate markets, but in hot markets offers might expire within 24 hours or less.

Some sellers take this concept to a whole new level, setting stringent requirements around offer acceptance. It’s up to buyers to determine whether or not they’re willing to reply quickly enough to meet the sellers’ time demands or risk losing the deal.

Trying Not to Take Things Personally

It might not feel like “all’s fair in buying and selling a home” since it’s one of the biggest financial transactions many will make in their lifetime. But buyers and sellers shouldn’t be surprised if it comes with a little bit of literal give and take.

And while it might seem like a personal affront to have a real estate offer rejected, it’s possible (and even likely) that the seller has multiple offers or was simply able to strike a better deal.

When push comes to shove and purchase comes to close, buying a house is a matter of business, no matter how personal the home buying journey can feel.

The Takeaway

Real estate counter offers are a common form of business negotiation, and a first step in making a counter offer is knowing what can be negotiated. Being cognizant of counter offer etiquette can be helpful.

Having your home financing lined up can also be helpful. SoFi offers home loans with competitive rates and no hidden fees.

Get pre-qualified for a SoFi home loan in two minutes.



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